TBR-Themed Thursdays- 2/5/13

     It’s February and winter is almost over (although here in Florida winter never really begins!). So I thought that for this week’s TBR-Themed Thursday I would look at my TBR and find what books I could that would fit the theme of winter, snow, cold, etc. Here’s what I found:
Fiction: 
None! I don’t have anything marked that could easily fit into this category. Does anyone have any suggestions?
Non-fiction:
Arctic Dreams by Berry Lopez
Natural History; 496 pages
artic dreamsBarry Lopez’s National Book Award-winning classic study of the Far North is widely considered his masterpiece.Lopez offers a thorough examination of this obscure world-its terrain, its wildlife, its history of Eskimo natives and intrepid explorers who have arrived on their icy shores. But what turns this marvelous work of natural history into a breathtaking study of profound originality is his unique meditation on how the landscape can shape our imagination, desires, and dreams. Its prose as hauntingly pure as the land it describes,Arctic Dreams is nothing less than an indelible classic of modern literature. (from Goodreads)
The Worst Journey in the World by Apsley Cherry-Garrard
Memoir; 688 pages
the worst journeyThe Worst Journey in the World recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard, the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey, draws on his firsthand experiences as well as the diaries of his compatriots to create a stirring and detailed account of Scott’s legendary expedition. Cherry himself would be among the search party that discovered the corpses of Scott and his men, who had long since perished from starvation and brutal cold. It is through Cherry’s insightful narrative and keen descriptions that Scott and the other members of the expedition are fully memorialized. (from Goodreads)
Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster by Jon Krakauer
Memoir; 333 pages
into thin air   A bank of clouds was assembling on the not-so-distant horizon, but journalist-mountaineer Jon Krakauer, standing on the summit of Mt. Everest, saw nothing that “suggested that a murderous storm was bearing down.” He was wrong. The storm, which claimed five lives and left countless more–including Krakauer’s–in guilt-ridden disarray, would also provide the impetus for Into Thin Air, Krakauer’s epic account of the May 1996 disaster.

By writing Into Thin Air, Krakauer may have hoped to exorcise some of his own demons and lay to rest some of the painful questions that still surround the event. He takes great pains to provide a balanced picture of the people and events he witnessed and gives due credit to the tireless and dedicated Sherpas. He also avoids blasting easy targets such as Sandy Pittman, the wealthy socialite who brought an espresso maker along on the expedition. Krakauer’s highly personal inquiry into the catastrophe provides a great deal of insight into what went wrong. But for Krakauer himself, further interviews and investigations only lead him to the conclusion that his perceived failures were directly responsible for a fellow climber’s death. Clearly, Krakauer remains haunted by the disaster, and although he relates a number of incidents in which he acted selflessly and even heroically, he seems unable to view those instances objectively. In the end, despite his evenhanded and even generous assessment of others’ actions, he reserves a full measure of vitriol for himself.  (from Goodreads)

Winter Word: The Ingenuity of Animal Survival by Bernd Heinrich
Science, Nature; 368 pages
 
winter worldFrom award-winning writer and biologist Bernd Heinrich, an intimate, accessible and eloquent illumination of animal survival in Winter.From flying squirrels to grizzly bears, torpid turtles to insects with antifreeze, the animal kingdom relies on some staggering evolutionary innovations to survive winter. Unlike their human counterparts, who must alter their environment to accommodate our physical limitations, animals are adaptable to an amazing range of conditions–i.e., radical changes in a creature’s physiology take place to match the demands of the environment. Winter provides an especially remarkable situation, because of how drastically it affects the most elemental component of all life: water. Examining everything from food sources in the extremely barren winter landscape to the chemical composition that allows certain creatures to survive, Heinrich’s “Winter World” awakens the largely undiscovered mysteries by which nature sustains herself through the harsh, cruel exigencies of winters. (from Goodreads)
The Palace of the Snow Queen: Winter Travels in Lapland by Barbara Sjoholm
Travel; 320 pages
palace of the snow queenA Frequent traveler to Northern Europe, Barbara Sjoholm set off one winter to explore a region that had long intrigued her. Sjoholm first travels to Kiruna, Sweden, to see the Ice Hotel under construction and to meet the ice artists who make its rooms into environmental art. Traveling to the North Cape, she encounters increasing darkness and cold, but also radiant light over the mountains and snow fields. She crosses the Finnmark Plateau by dogsled, attends a Sami film festival (with an outdoor ice screen), and visits Santa’s Post Office in Finland. Over the course of three winters, Sjoholm unearths the region’s rich history, including the culture of the Sami.In The Palace of the Snow Queen, Sjoholm relates her adventures in the far north, and considers how ice and snow shape our imaginations and create, at a time of global warming, a vision that increasingly draws visitors to Lapland.

What books do you have on your TBR with a winter theme? How has your winter been so far?

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About hillarypat

I'm a recent college graduate and this is my blog where I talk about whatever happens to be on my mind- mostly books!
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3 Responses to TBR-Themed Thursdays- 2/5/13

  1. severalfourmany says:

    Ha! I’m reading Twain’s Following the Equator so I guess I’m trying to get as far from winter as possible.

  2. Lee-Anne says:

    I would highly recommend Thomas Wharton’s Icefields. It’s fascinating! And my all-time favourite winter themed book.

    Here is the summary from Goodreads:

    Winner of:
    The Banff Grand National Prize for Literature
    The Writers Guild of Alberta Best First Book Award
    The Commonwealth Best First Novel Prize (Caribbean and Canada Region)

    At a quarter past three in the afternoon, on August 17, 1898, Doctor Edward Byrne slipped on the ice of Acturus glacier in the Canadian Rockies and slid into a crevasse . . .

    Nearly sixty feet below the surface, Byrne is wedged upside down between the narrowing walls of a chasm, fighting his desire to sleep. The ice in front of him is lit with a pale blue-green radiance. There, embedded in he pure, antediluvian glacier, Byrne sees something that will inextricably link him to the vast bed of ice, and the people who inhabit this strange corner of the world. In this moment, his life becomes a quest to uncover the mystery of the icefield that almost became his tomb.

    Within the deceptively simple framework of a tourist guidebook, Icefields takes a breathtaking, imaginative look at the human spirit, loss, myth, and elusive truths. Here is an impressive literary landscape, and an expedition unlike any you have ever experienced.

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